Book Review: Inevitable Ascension by V. K. McAllister

July 10, 2017

Title: Inevitable Ascension

Author: V. K. McAllister

Series: N/A, stand-alone novel

Publication Date: September 12, 2015 

Page Count:342

Genre: Fantasy, dystopia, science fiction

Format: eBook

Source: ARC, author

Rating:​

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS (FROM GOODREADS):​

The innocent never waver from doing what’s right, even if it means drowning the world in fire. 

 

Violina had been burned and betrayed by mankind ever since she sprang into existence. They named her a heretic and condemned her to a pit to live and die in agony. Though she sat stranded, starved and bloodied, she would not submit. Violina, the girl who had been mocked and hunted for rejecting the warped ideals of artificial authority, would lay down her own law. 

Inevitable Ascension — The rapid-fire action/adventure novel packed with a host of twists that will make your mind explode! But not literally, otherwise that would be really gross. 

 

 

 

MY THOUGHTS:​

This book started off with a more fantasy like intro, but it progressed to be more dystonia with occasional fantasy factors as we progressed into the story.

 

So basically, in the world of Eden, things are falling apart. Our protagonists, Lux and Violina, are criminals of justice. But according to them, the leaders are just useless and fair slugs, and they are the true saints.  We begin with the girls made their brief escape from the museum after a mission, they ran into women named Vexia who got them back in time.

 

Now the reason Eden is in this horrible state today is because of a mistake in the past - something that happened with the two suns. It took me about 3 seconds to figure out that our protagonists are going to be the 'chosen ones' who restore the mistakes of the past and save the world in general - therefore living of to the "The rapid-fire action/adventure novel packed with a host of twists that will make your mind explode". 

 

They had the rapid-fire action/adventure all right, but I think it's the time traveling that is going to make my head explode. The constant going back and forth is making my head hurt, and every time I start to like Violina and Lux I start to dislike them.

 

Don't get me wrong, the author was still able to get them to grow on me. But half my brain power is already used up trying to catch up with the entire time traveling adventure (which is why I'm not a big fan of this genre in general), and occasionally their attitudes kind of got on my nerves, which I will further explain later.  

 

We travel back into the Dark Age, then back to the present, then into the Ice Age - oh and the Steam Age that is the title of Chapter 1. 

 

But let me make one thing clear: I am not complaining. The heart and core that makes a good time-traveling story, the thing that makes them actually good is the vortex: the butterfly effects we see from all the changes the characters made in the past, and the little twists in the ending that got us all go:  


And this book got that. The girls literally entered a vortex, and we can clearly see the butterfly effect taking place from all the things they did after they traveled back 500 years.

 

However, as the book progresses, I realize that I am slowly disliking Lux and Violina. I don't really like how they think themselves as the 'sole savior of the universe' (even though they kind of are, because they're the main characters). I believe humility is not overrated, and if we see more depth in their character other than their sole desire for their so called 'freedom', it will kind of make them more likable. 

 

But no matter what I said, this book is really okay, and I still find myself enjoying it despite my unfamiliarity with the genre.  I love how logical the story was despite its complex contents, which greater highlighted the authors' ability to hold the story in one piece. Also, I really appreciated how the story made sense (because it's logical), and didn't left any unanswered questions out, which helped the story to wrap up nicely. Not to add on, even though magic, time traveling, and dysopia are genres with some differences, the author managed to use them all and combine into one to create a story, and made it all made sense. 

 

I give this book 3 and a half stars because I liked it, but it's still not my slice of cake. However, this does not make it a bad book whatsoever, and I strongly suggest it to any fans of sci-fi mixed with dystopia and magic out there. 

 

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